Monthly Archives: November 2013

Double bill at the Haunch of Venison – Wim Wenders and Eve Sussman

Here I am, still taken aback by the emotional roller-coaster and visual masterpiece that is Pina, and along comes Mr Wim Wenders to blow me off my feet again…

‘Places, Strange and Quiet’, takes us on a trip and gives us a chance, at least for a couple of hours, to see the world through his eyes. And what eyes… Among the almost 40 photographs taken from 1983 – 2011 are beautifully contrasted black and white images, gigantic ultra graphic c-prints and even some tiny polaroids.

Despite being taken in so many different countries (from Japan to Brazil, Germany to Albania), there is a common element to all of his photographs – a sort of dystopic, ephemeral quality. They’re constantly referencing a humanity that isn’t there, bringing forth traces of a past which reinforce the present, making each captured moment both beautiful and melancholic.

It’s interesting how the lack of people is exactly what makes his photographs so narrative – the director persona is present in every shot, setting the scenery and inviting our minds to fill in the blanks and create our own stories.

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On the ground floor,  Eve Sussman’s videos and photographs subtly drag us into a timeless world where past and future come together in an everlasting, cyclic, present.

“The exhibition centers around whiteonwhite:algorithmicnoir a film that follows the observations and surveillance of a geophysicist code writer stuck in a futuristic city. The experimental fiction runs endlessly, editing live in real time, with no beginning, middle or end, never repeating the same way twice. ”  Below are some stills from the film.

Both exhibitions are on until May 14th

Haunch of Venison Gallery
6 Burlington Gardens
London W1S 3ET
020 7495 5050

who shot the sheriff?

“Queer jew socialist boy seeks a better world” said one of the signs in the 1978 anti racism rally-turned-concert that united punk and reggae, took east London’s Victoria Park by storm and changed the course of music and politics in the UK. 

This is the full story – a film for all the cynics and skeptics who think they can’t change the world…



So glad I caught this at the EEFF. Although I wasn’t even born at the time and am not a Londoner per say, I couldn’t help but get goosebumps when I saw such a familiar scenery taken by the crowd, united for something they believed in. 



More about the history and events that lead to the 1978 Carnival – including Eric Clapton’s racist remarks – here